The Latest: Libertarian Johnson to appear on Ohio ballot

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. presidential race (all times EDT):

9:40 a.m.

Ohio’s elections chief has cleared the way for Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson to appear on fall ballots in the critical swing state.

Johnson’s ballot access had been in question after party activists submitted paperwork and voter signatures earlier this month on behalf of a different candidate. They said they planned to swap in Johnson.

Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted (HYOO’-sted) has said Ohio law neither openly permits nor bars the switch, but he would allow it as long as elections boards validated enough voter signatures.

Husted’s office announced Wednesday that Johnson’s supporters have met the signature requirements.

Libertarians aren’t recognized as a political party in Ohio, so activists sought to collect enough signatures from voters to get Johnson on the ballot by way of a process for independent candidates.


8:25 a.m.

A son of Donald Trump says it would be foolish for his father to release his tax returns.

The Republican presidential nominee has broken with precedent by refusing to release them. He says they are being audited and he can’t release them until the audit is complete.

His son, Eric Trump, said Wednesday on CNBC not much can be learned from tax returns. He said his father’s returns are massive and “you would have a bunch of people who know nothing about taxes” looking through them and making “assumptions on things they know nothing about.”

Democrats say Trump’s returns would reveal whether he was paying a fair amount in taxes and whether he would personally benefit from his policy proposals.


7:25 a.m.

As the Zika virus continues to spread, Hillary Clinton is proposing a new fund to improve the federal government’s response to major public health crises.

The Democratic presidential nominee says the U.S. is failing to sufficiently invest in public health preparedness, not only for Zika, but health threats from potentially pandemic diseases, climate change and possible bioterrorism.

If elected, Clinton would create what she’s calling a “Public Health Rapid Response Fund” to help federal agencies and local hospital systems respond faster and more aggressively.

Her campaign did not detail the size of the fund, its annual budget or whether it would be paid for with other government revenue.

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