Survey to gauge Cleveland residents’ thoughts on police

CLEVELAND (AP) — Residents of Cleveland will have an opportunity to participate in a phone survey gauging their interactions with the city’s police force as part of a settlement reached with federal officials.

The survey scheduled to begin in a few weeks is part of a settlement reached between the city and the U.S. Department of Justice in May of last year following an 18-month investigation into Cleveland officers’ use of excessive force, reported (

The survey will be conducted by the Los Angeles-based data collection firm ISA, which will be paid $102,000.

Calls will be placed between April 29 and May 20, and the results will be released publicly on June 22.

Christine Cole, a member of the team monitoring the city’s settlement, said survey conductors will call residents throughout Cleveland on landlines and cellphones. More calls will be placed in areas that experience a higher rate of arrest, Cole said.

Responding residents will answer questions regarding their experiences with police, their perceptions of officers and their thoughts on public safety.

The survey will consider “age, gender, race, ethnicity, geography, socioeconomic status, and other characteristics or affiliations in an effort to understand the perceptions of sub-groups as well as those who have and have not experienced encounters with the police,” according to a plan filed in court and approved last week.

More surveys will be conducted in two years to examine public perception of the city’s progress on court-ordered reform initiatives.

The settlement included changes on how Cleveland officers use force. It became public just days after a white Cleveland patrolman was acquitted of criminal charges for his role in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire that left two unarmed black suspects dead in a car in 2012.


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