AP News in Brief at 9:04 p.m. EST


Trump, Pence address potential of Romney, Mattis in Cabinet

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump said Sunday that he had “made a couple of deals” after spending the weekend meeting with a long list of potential administration appointees, but he did not reveal any more picks.

Trump and the vice president-elect, Mike Pence, did drop some hints. Pence said that Mitt Romney was “under active and serious consideration” to become the nation’s next secretary of state. Trump said retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis was an “impressive” prospect for defense secretary.

“I think we have some really incredible people going to be working for the country,” Trump said Sunday evening. “We really had some incredible meetings. You’ll be hearing about them soon.”

Among the visitors to the white-pillared clubhouse Sunday were Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, billionaire investor Wilbur Ross and retired Marine Gen. John Kelly, the former commander of U.S. Southern Command.

Between conversations, Trump revealed he was making plans for transitioning his family. He told reporters that his wife, Melania, and their 10-year-old son, Barron, would move to Washington when the school year ends.

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Trump children’s roles blur line between transition, company

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly every morning since their father’s stunning victory on Election Day, three of Donald Trump’s grown children walk through the Trump Tower lobby and board an elevator. But are Don Jr., Ivanka and Eric going to the campaign office on the fifth floor? Their business offices on the 25th floor? The president-elect’s penthouse on the 56th floor?

That uncertainty highlights the multiple roles the children play for their father. For the past year, the lines were constantly blurred between political campaign and business empire, raising questions about a possible conflict of interest between Trump’s White House and his sprawling business interests.

The children are poised to wield incredible influence over their father, even if they don’t follow him to Washington. Trump said consistently during the campaign that if he won, those children would stay in New York and run his business. But the three — plus Ivanka’s husband, Jared Kushner — were all named to the transition team’s executive committee.

So far, they’ve been heavily involved in shaping the new administration. They’ve sat in on meetings and taken late night calls from their father. They advocated for making Reince Priebus, the Republican National Committee chairman, the White House chief of staff. They counseled against bringing back Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s first campaign manager, who was fired in June on their advice.

On Thursday, Ivanka Trump and Kushner were present for the president-elect’s meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump Tower.

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10 Things to Know for Monday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Monday:

1. MITT ROMNEY POSSIBLE PICK FOR SECRETARY OF STATE

The 2012 GOP presidential contender exchanged bitter insults with Trump during the campaign — but the two now appear on much better terms.

2. ASIA-PACIFIC LEADERS VOW TO RESIST PROTECTIONISM

The APEC summit ends with a joint pledge to work toward a sweeping new free trade agreement that would include all 21 members, including the U.S.

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San Antonio police officer fatally shot while writing ticket

A San Antonio police officer writing out a traffic ticket to a motorist was shot to death in his squad car Sunday outside police headquarters by another driver who pulled up from behind, authorities said.

San Antonio police Chief William McManus identified the officer as Detective Benjamin Marconi, 50, a 20-year veteran of the force.

McManus said the suspect had not been apprehended Sunday night. He said he doesn’t believe the man has any relationship to the original motorist who was pulled over, and no motive has been identified.

“We consider this suspect to be extremely dangerous and a clear threat to law enforcement officers and the public,” said McManus, who added that after the shooting officers had been instructed to not make traffic stops alone.

McManus said Marconi had pulled over a vehicle and while he was inside his squad car writing a ticket, a car pulled up behind him. The driver of that car got out, walked up to the officer’s driver-side window and shot Marconi twice in the head, then walked back to his car and drove away.

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Asia-Pacific summit closes with call to work for free trade

LIMA, Peru (AP) — Leaders of 21 Asia-Pacific nations ended their annual summit Sunday with a call to resist protectionism amid signs of increased free-trade skepticism, highlighted by the victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election.

The Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum also closed with a joint pledge to work toward a sweeping new free trade agreement that would include all 21 members as a path to “sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth,” despite the political climate.

“We reaffirm our commitment to keep our markets open and to fight against all forms of protectionism,” the leaders of the APEC nations said in a joint statement.

APEC noted the “rising skepticism over trade” amid an uneven recovery since the financial crisis and said that “the benefits of trade and open markets need to be communicated to the wider public more effectively, emphasizing how trade promotes innovation, employment and higher living standards.”

Speaking to journalists at the conclusion of the summit, Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski said the main obstacle to free trade agreements in Asia and around the world is the frustration felt by those left behind by globalization.

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GOP sweep heightens anxiety for many transgender Americans

NEW YORK (AP) — Anxiety is high among many transgender Americans after the sweeping Republican election victory. They fear stronger resistance to their push for civil-rights protections, including broader access to public restrooms, and wonder if their newly won right to serve openly in the military is in jeopardy.

Transgender people “are concerned for their safety, survival and legal rights in the coming years,” said Chase Strangio, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who often works on transgender issues.

Among the specific concerns:

— Many transgender people expect that Republican President-elect Donald Trump’s administration will abandon or weaken the efforts by President Barack Obama’s administration to enable transgender students to use the bathrooms of their choice at public schools. Republican officials in numerous states have opposed that campaign, saying schools should not be required to let such students use bathrooms or locker rooms based on their gender identity.

— There are fears that more GOP-governed states will approve legislation limiting transgender rights and will reject proposals to expand such rights.

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Judge: No bail for 2 teens in congressman’s grandson’s death

CHICAGO (AP) — Bail was denied Sunday afternoon for two teenagers charged with first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of an Illinois congressman’s grandson following an argument over a pair of basketball shoes.

The 16-year-old boy and 17-year-old girl appeared before Cook County Judge James Brown wearing juvenile detention center sweatshirts, their heads bowed, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Brown called the killing of U.S. Rep. Danny Davis’ grandson a “total callous disregard for human life.”

Police said the two were arrested after they were identified as suspects in Friday’s shooting death of 15-year-old Javon Wilson. The shooting stemmed from a dispute over basketball shoes, police said, adding that Wilson knew his attackers and they may have been friends at some point.

Chicago has seen a dramatic rise in the number of shootings and homicides, with August being the deadliest month in the city in two decades. There have been 673 homicides so far this year, including the fatal shootings of the cousin of Chicago Bulls basketball star Dwyane Wade, a Chicago police officer’s son and the son of a famed percussionist.

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Obama: I’ll push back on Trump if needed to defend US ideals

LIMA, Peru (AP) — President Barack Obama said Sunday he doesn’t intend to become his successor’s constant critic — but reserved the right to speak out if President-elect Donald Trump or his policies breach certain “values or ideals.”

Offering a rare glimpse into his thoughts on his post-presidency, Obama suggested once he was out of office he would uphold the tradition of ex-presidents stepping aside quietly to allow their successors space to govern. He heaped praise on former President George W. Bush, saying he “could not have been more gracious to me when I came in” and said he wanted to give Trump the same chance to pursue his agenda “without somebody popping off” at every turn.

But Obama suggested there may be limits to his silence.

“As an American citizen who cares deeply about our country, if there are issues that have less to do with the specifics of some legislative proposal or battle or go to core questions about our values and ideals, and if I think that it’s necessary or helpful for me to defend those ideals, I’ll examine it when it comes,” Obama told reporters.

Obama, who has consistently praised Bush for the way he’s handled his ex-presidency, faces a conundrum about how to handle his own. Though he’s vowed to ensure a smooth handover of power, Obama is keenly aware he’s being replaced by a new president who holds antithetical views on issue after issue.

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Syrian government refuses UN truce terms for Aleppo

BEIRUT (AP) — The Syrian government refused the U.N. envoy’s latest proposal for a truce in Aleppo on Sunday, calling on insurgents to withdraw and saying it would not grant autonomy to the rebel-held east in exchange for calm.

Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem said restoring government rule was a matter of “national sovereignty,” and that Damascus would not allow the people of eastern Aleppo to be “hostages to 6,000 gunmen.”

“We agreed on the need that terrorists should get out of east Aleppo to end the suffering of the civilians in the city,” he said.

He spoke after meeting with U.N. envoy Staffan de Mistura, who acknowledged a “major disagreement” with al-Moallem and said a “creative” if interim solution was required to halt the violence.

“We are only proposing that there should not be a radical dramatic change in the administration of Aleppo until there is a political solution,” he said.

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115 dead as train derails in north India; some still trapped

PUKHRAYAN, India (AP) — Rescuers worked through the night to pull people out of mangled coaches after an overnight passenger train derailed early Sunday in northern India, killing at least 115 people, police said.

The death toll was expected to rise further because rescue workers had yet to gain access to one of the worst-damaged of the 14 coaches that derailed, said Daljeet Chaudhary, a director general of police. About 150 people were injured, he said.

The train derailed at around 3:10 a.m., jolting awake passengers who had settled in for the long trip. Survivors and bodies were retrieved from mangled coaches that had fallen on their side.

Ramchandra Tewari, a passenger who suffered a head injury, said he was asleep when he was suddenly flung to the floor of his coach.

“There was a loud sound like an earthquake. I fell from my berth and a lot of luggage fell over me,” Tewari told reporters from his hospital bed in the city of Kanpur. “I thought I was dead, and then I passed out.”

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