AP News in Brief at 12:04 a.m. EDT

Video shows deadly encounter between police, black man

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Video of a deadly encounter between Charlotte police and a black man shows his wife repeatedly telling officers he is not armed and pleading with them not to shoot her husband as they shout at him to drop a gun.

The footage, recorded by Keith Lamont Scott’s wife and released Friday by his family, offers a raw look at how the situation unfolded but does not show whether Scott had a gun as police have said. Uncertainty about the case prompted a fourth night of demonstrations through Charlotte’s business district.

After darkness fell, dozens or people carried signs and chanted to urge police to release dashboard and body camera video that could show more clearly what happened. Police have said Scott was armed, but witnesses say he held only a book.

The 2 ½-minute video released by the family does not show the shooting, though gunshots can be heard. In the video Scott’s wife, Rakeyia Scott, tells officers that he has a TBI, or traumatic brain injury. At one point, she tells her husband to get out of the car so police don’t break the windows. She also tells him, “don’t do it,” but it’s not clear exactly what she means.

As the encounter escalates, she repeatedly urges police, “You better not shoot him.”


Imam in bombing suspect’s hometown speaks against violence

ELIZABETH, N.J. (AP) — An imam spoke against violence and in support of law enforcement during the first Friday prayer service since a local man was charged in last weekend’s New Jersey and New York City bombings.

Imam Syed Fakhruddin Alvi urged the more than 100 men gathered at the Muslim Community Center of Union County to be vigilant in leading their families and children away from evil.

Mosque leaders called bombing suspect Ahmad Khan Rahami, an Afghanistan-born U.S. citizen whose father is an active member of the mosque, misguided and said people who follow extremist teachings are criminals.

“Nobody has any right to kill any non-Muslim,” the imam said. “If anyone kills a non-Muslim citizen, paradise will be done for him.”

Mosque members said Rahami’s father frequently prays there, including this week after Rahami was injured by police in a shootout in Linden hours after he was named the suspect.


GOP lawmaker: FBI gave immunity to top Clinton aide

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton’s former chief of staff, Cheryl Mills, and two other staff members were granted immunity deals in exchange for their cooperation in the now-closed FBI investigation into Clinton’s use of a private email server as secretary of state, says a Republican congressman.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, told The Associated Press on Friday that Mills gave federal investigators access to her laptop on the condition that what they found couldn’t be used against her.

Democrats on the committee said Friday the immunity agreements were limited in scope and did not cover statements made to investigators or to potential testimony before Congress.

Still, Chaffetz said he was “absolutely stunned” that the FBI would cut a deal with someone as close to the investigation as Mills. By including the emails recovered from the laptops in the immunity agreements, the Justice Department exempted key physical evidence from any potential criminal case against the aides.

“No wonder they couldn’t prosecute a case,” said Chaffetz, R-Utah. “They were handing out immunity deals like candy.”


Cruz to vote for Trump, whom he once called ‘utterly amoral’

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ted Cruz announced Friday he will vote for Donald Trump, a dramatic about-face that may help unite a deeply divided Republican Party months after the fiery Texas conservative called Trump a “pathological liar” and “utterly amoral.”

Cruz said he was simply following through on a promise to support his party’s presidential nominee, even though the New York billionaire had nicknamed him “Lyin’ Ted,” insulted his wife and linked his father to the John F. Kennedy assassination.

But facing intensifying political pressure to back Trump, Cruz said he would cast a vote for Trump, while stopping short of an official endorsement in a statement posted Friday on Facebook.

The distinction may matter little to voters, but helps Cruz save face among those supporters still unwilling to forgive Trump’s heated attacks during their ugly and often intensely personal primary campaign. Cruz was booed by Trump supporters at the national convention for encouraging Republicans to “vote your conscience.”

“After many months of careful consideration, of prayer and searching my own conscience, I have decided that on Election Day, I will vote for the Republican nominee, Donald Trump,” Cruz wrote Friday.


Authorities: 4 dead in shooting at mall north of Seattle

SEATTLE (AP) — Authorities in Washington state say four people have been killed during a shooting at a mall north of Seattle and that at least one suspect remains at large.

The Washington State Patrol says on Twitter that the four were shot Friday at the Cascade Mall in Burlington, about 65 miles (105 kilometers) north of Seattle.

Sgt. Mark Francis says authorities are searching for a man wearing gray who was last seen walking toward Interstate 5. Francis says it wasn’t immediately known if there was more than one gunman involved.

Francis said at about 8:30 p.m. that the mall had been evacuated and emergency medical personnel were cleared to enter and attend to any injuries. It wasn’t immediately clear how many people were hurt.

The Cascade Mall is an enclosed shopping mall in Burlington, Washington that opened in 1990, according to the mall’s website. It features J.C. Penney, TJ Maxx, and Macy’s stores, among other stores, restaurants and a movie theater.


AP-GfK Poll: Majority of Americans fear Trump presidency

NEW YORK (AP) — More than half the country fears a Trump presidency. And only about a third of Americans believe he is at least somewhat qualified to serve in the White House.

In the final sprint to Election Day, a new Associated Press-GfK poll underscores those daunting roadblocks for Donald Trump as he tries to overtake Hillary Clinton.

Moreover, most voters oppose the hard-line approach to immigration that is a centerpiece of the billionaire businessman’s campaign. They are more likely to trust Clinton to handle a variety of issues facing the country, and Trump has no advantage on the national security topics also at the forefront of his bid.

Trump undoubtedly has a passionate base of support, seen clearly among the thousands of backers who fill the stands at his signature rallies. But most people don’t share that fervor. Only 29 percent of registered voters would be excited and just 24 percent would be proud should Trump prevail in November.

Only one in four voters find him even somewhat civil or compassionate, and just a third say he’s not at all racist.


MH370 wreckage hunter won’t give up until mystery solved

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The fedora, the bomber jacket and the consuming quest invite comparisons to Indiana Jones. Blaine Gibson, though, hasn’t matched the film hero’s triumph in finding the legendary chest containing the stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments.

Not that he didn’t try. “The Ark of the Covenant, I did not find it. However, I do believe that it’s in Ethiopia somewhere,” Gibson told AP recently.

The amateur sleuth has had far greater success finding clues from a modern mystery: the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

He is the first person searching for the plane who’s actually found any trace of it and says he won’t quit gathering clues until the mystery is solved.

“Travel is what I do, but I always love travel with a purpose, and solving the mystery of Malaysia 370 is a purpose … until I or someone else finds out what happened to the plane and those on board,” he said while in the Australian capital of Canberra to visit the headquarters for the official plane search.


Syria diplomacy: A US-Russia deal unravels and war revs up

NEW YORK (AP) — In a New York hotel room earlier this week, Russia thought it was close to a deal with the U.S. to revive a cease-fire deal for Syria.

A three-day period of calm would go into effect, accompanied by Syrian and Russian planes leaving the skies over northern Syria, according to a concept that Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov developed late Wednesday night. That would permit Syria’s warring sides to reaffirm their support and prove their commitment to a U.S.-Russian plan for ending the civil war.

But neither government had signed off on the diplomats’ plans, according to U.S. and Russian officials with knowledge of the private conversations in the Palace Hotel.

And after Kerry consulted others in the Obama administration, he told Lavrov that the truce should last a week, said the officials, who weren’t authorized to speak publicly on the matter and demanded anonymity.

Lavrov, according to one official, threw up his hands in exasperation.


Obama vetoes 9/11 bill; possible override by Congress looms

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama rejected a bill Friday that would have allowed the families of 9/11 victims to sue the government of Saudi Arabia, arguing it undermined national security and setting up the possibility Congress may override his veto for the first time in his presidency.

Obama’s move escalates the fight over an emotional issue that has overlapped with the campaign debate over terrorism and the Middle East. The bill had sailed through both chambers of Congress with bipartisan support, clearing the final hurdle just days before the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania.

The president said the bill, which doesn’t refer specifically to Saudi Arabia, could backfire by opening up the U.S. government and its officials to lawsuits by anyone accusing the U.S. of supporting terrorism, rightly or wrongly.

“I have deep sympathy for the families of the victims of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001,” Obama wrote to the Senate in a veto message about the bill, the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act. But, he said, “the JASTA would be detrimental to U.S. national interests more broadly.”

Congress is determined to try to overturn the veto, which requires a two-thirds vote in the House and Senate. Previous attempts to overturn Obama’s vetoes have all been unsuccessful.


Kevin Garnett says ‘farewell’ after 21 seasons in the NBA

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — No fire burned hotter, no mouth was fouler, no opponent was in for a longer night than Kevin Garnett’s.

In more than two decades in the NBA, Garnett opened the door for a new wave of young talent to enter the league, was partly responsible for a rewriting of the collective bargaining agreement and nearly singlehandedly redefined what the game’s tallest players were allowed to do on the court.

Fittingly, and maybe a little reluctantly, No. 21 is calling it a career after 21 years, leaving a legacy as one of the best defensive players in league history and one of the game’s most influential and intense competitors.

Garnett posted a video on his Instagram account on Friday, saying “farewell” and “thank you for the journey.” He narrated the short, black-and-white video that shows him walking alone through Target Center with sunglasses on.

“I’m just thankful. I can’t even put that into words,” Garnett says. “I’m just thankful. I’m just thankful for everybody and the love. I never would have thought that people love me like this. But, for it to be reality is just something else, man. Man.”

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