AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT

UN suspends Syria aid convoys after ‘savage’ attack

BEIRUT (AP) — The United States on Tuesday blamed Russia for an overnight attack on an aid convoy that killed 20 civilians as the U.N. announced it was suspending overland aid deliveries in Syria, jeopardizing food and medical security for millions of besieged and hard-to-reach civilians.

Confusion continued about who struck the convoy, but the White House insisted it was either Russia or Syria. White House deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes said either way, the U.S. held Russia responsible, because it was Russia’s job under the week-old cease-fire to prevent Syria’s air force from striking in areas where humanitarian aid was being transported.

“All of our information indicates clearly that this was an airstrike,” Rhodes said, rejecting the claim by Russia’s Defense Ministry that a cargo fire caused the damage. Both Russia and Syria have denied carrying out the bombing.

Within one minute of the strike, the U.S. tracked a Russian-made Su-24 directly over the region of the attack, U.S. officials said. Even that revelation failed to definitively implicate Russia because both the Russian and Syrian air forces fly the Su-24, although the U.S. officials said there were strong indications that the jet was flown by the Russian military.

The officials spoke anonymously because they were not authorized to comment publicly on the incident.


Court papers: Suspect vowed ‘bombs will be heard’ in streets

NEW YORK (AP) — Ahmad Khan Rahami vowed to martyr himself rather than be caught after setting off explosives in New York and New Jersey, and he’d hoped in a handwritten journal championing jihad that “the sounds of bombs will be heard in the streets,” federal terrorism charges lodged against him Tuesday alleged.

Criminal complaints in Manhattan and New Jersey federal courts provided chilling descriptions of what authorities say drove the Afghan-born U.S. citizen to set off explosives in New York and New Jersey, including a bomb that injured over two dozen people when it blew up on a busy Manhattan street.

Meanwhile, more details emerged Tuesday about Rahami’s past, including the disclosure that the FBI had looked into him in 2014 but came up with nothing.

According to the court complaints, Rahami’s journal included a passage that accused the U.S. government of slaughtering Muslim holy warriors in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and elsewhere.

“Inshallah (God willing) the sounds of the bombs will be heard in the streets. Gun shots to your police. Death to your OPPRESSION,” the journal ended.


10 Things to Know for Wednesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:


Investigators say Ahmad Khan Rahami planted two bombs in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, and two in New Jersey.


White House Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes says that since the Syrian rebels lack an air force, that means either Syria or Russia conducted the strikes.


Police: Charlotte officer fatally shoots armed person

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Police in North Carolina shot and killed a man carrying a gun Tuesday afternoon at a Charlotte apartment complex, officials said.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officers went to the complex about 4 p.m. looking for a suspect with an outstanding warrant when they encountered the man — not the suspect they were looking for — inside a car, department spokesman Keith Trietley said in a statement.

Officers saw the man get out the car with a gun and then get back in, Trietley said. When officers approached the car, the man got out of the car with the gun again. At that point, officers deemed the man a threat and at least one fired a weapon, he said.

The man, identified as 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, was taken to Carolinas Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

Detectives recovered a firearm at the scene and were interviewing witnesses, Trietley said.


Lawyers for slain Tulsa man: Drug discussion a distraction

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Investigators found the drug PCP in the vehicle of an unarmed black man fatally shot by a white officer, according to Oklahoma police, but attorneys for the slain man’s family say a discussion of drugs distracts from questions about the use of deadly force.

Tulsa Sgt. Dave Walker told the Tulsa World on Tuesday that investigators recovered one vial of PCP in Terence Crutcher’s SUV, but he declined to say where in the vehicle it was found or whether officers determined if Crutcher used it Friday night. Walker confirmed to The Associated Press that what he told the newspaper was true, but declined further comment.

A spokeswoman for the state medical examiner’s office said autopsy and toxicology results for Crutcher are pending, and police said Tuesday the toxicology report could take several weeks.

Attorneys for Crutcher’s family said the man’s relatives did not know whether drugs were found in his vehicle and, even if they were, that wouldn’t justify his fatal shooting.

“Let us not be throwing a red herring, and to say because something was found in the car that was justification to shoot him,” said attorney Benjamin Crump, one of the family’s lawyers.


1 Air Force pilot dead, 1 hurt after ejecting in California

SUTTER, Calif. (AP) — One American pilot was killed and another injured when they ejected from a U-2 spy plane shortly before it crashed in Northern California on Tuesday morning, the U.S. Air Force said.

The plane crashed shortly after taking off from Beale Air Force Base on a training mission around 9 a.m., military officials said. They did not release the pilots’ names or any information about the condition of the surviving airman.

The aircraft, assigned to the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron, crashed in the Sutter Buttes, a mountain range about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north of Sacramento.

Col. Larry Broadwell, the base commander, said the flight, including its flight path was routine before the crash. He pledged to support the family of the deceased pilot and said surveillance pilots will mourn the loss.

“These incidents, while extremely tragic and hard for us to overcome, they’re incidents that we do overcome,” Broadwell said. “I am confident that the U-2 squadrons here and the U-2 squadrons around the world are going to come off the mat stronger than they were before.”


Trump skips swing-state cities; opts for rural town instead

KENANSVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Donald Trump is spending a lot of time in this critical presidential swing state, but he campaigned Tuesday evening far from cities like Charlotte and Raleigh where many candidates have courted moderate voters in recent years.

Instead, he zeroed in on this tiny, rural town of about 850 people to make his pitch to the disaffected, working-class white voters who have propelled his campaign. The strategy appears to be less about swaying undecideds and more about making sure supporters don’t stay home on Election Day.

Registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans 2-1 in Duplin County, but voters here have chosen the GOP presidential candidate in the past two elections by a wide margin. Among those lifelong Democrats is James Teachey, a 78-year-old retired farmer who said this year was the first time he donated to a presidential campaign: $40 to Trump.

“People are sick and tired of the way things are going in Washington and the way people are running it,” he said. “I was born coming out of the Depression. We know what a dollar means, what leaving your door unlocked means. And all those things are gone.”

Trump’s business background is a big draw for his supporters here in Kenansville, where beyond the small downtown area’s handful of restaurants, gas stations and a couple of grocery stores lie farms that are the area’s major economic driver. Pork and poultry growers and processing plants employ thousands in Duplin County and have drawn Latino residents who now account for more than 20 percent of its population of 60,000.


As Trump rises, Clinton struggles with traditional playbook

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — For months, Democrats argued that voters would get “serious” about the campaign once it reached the fall and would reject Donald Trump’s no-holds-barred approach.

They’re still waiting.

With fewer than 50 days left, polling shows a tightening national race and — most unnerving to Democrats — a Trump rise in key battleground states. But as Trump’s provocative appeal gains traction, Hillary Clinton is sticking with the traditional playbook: Lots of attack ads, a focus on getting out the vote and intense preparation for next week’s first general election debate.

Her approach underscores what’s emerged as a central question of the 2016 campaign: Can Clinton’s play-it-safe political strategy win against a chaos candidate?

Even President Barack Obama, who long dismissed the idea of a future Trump administration, has started ringing alarm bells, warning Democratic supporters to expect a tight race that Clinton could possibly lose. Recent polls suggest the Republican may have an edge in Iowa and Ohio and is likely in a close race with Clinton in Florida and North Carolina.


Divorce will unspool the complex life Jolie and Pitt created

LOS ANGELES (AP) — For more than a decade, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt have been a glamorous, globe-trotting Hollywood power couple, attracting cameras to their film projects and philanthropy alike.

With six children, homes in the U.S. and France, and the philanthropic Jolie-Pitt Foundation, the pair has much at stake. The pair became a couple in 2004 but married two years ago — which could further complicate the divorce that Jolie Pitt filed for Monday, and put the future of all they’ve shared in the hands of teams of lawyers and accountants.

Under California law, only assets acquired during their marriage must be split equally, said Los Angeles divorce attorney Peter Walzer. Forbes magazine estimates the pair earned a combined $555 million since their relationship began, with pre-tax earnings of $117.5 million since their 2014 marriage.

If Jolie Pitt and Pitt haven’t already spelled out who owned what prior to their marriage, a divorce judge won’t have authority to help them work it out. Jolie Pitt’s filing did not indicate whether the couple has a prenuptial agreement.

“The rules are really unclear when you don’t get married and you don’t have a written partnership agreement,” said Walzer, who is vice president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.


US eliminated from World Cup of Hockey after loss to Canada

TORONTO (AP) — The United States has been eliminated from contention at the World Cup of Hockey after a 4-2 loss to Canada on Tuesday night that featured a clinical, dominant performance by the tournament favorite.

The U.S. (0-2) couldn’t keep up with Canada’s talent, depth or speed in a game it needed to win to stay alive. Canada and Team Europe clinched spots in the semifinals, while the Americans are left to analyze what went wrong on the international stage yet again.

Matt Duchene scored twice and Corey Perry and Patrice Bergeron each had a goal for Canada, which got 34 saves from Carey Price. U.S. goalie Jonathan Quick stopped 30 shots, keeping the game from becoming even more of a blowout.

Ryan McDonagh and T.J Oshie scored for the U.S., which ended Price’s shutout streak at 228:41.

U.S. general manager Dean Lombardi said in June that his goal was to build a team that could beat Canada. This loss dropped the U.S. to 1-5 against the world’s top hockey power in best-on-best competition going back to the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

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