AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT


After turmoil, Sanders, Mrs Obama, Warren thrill convention

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — First lady Michelle Obama stepped into the presidential election Monday with a forceful, impassioned defense of Hillary Clinton, casting her as the only candidate who can be trusted as a role model for the nation’s children. She took numerous swipes at Republican Donald Trump, all without mentioning his name.

“I want someone with the proven strength to persevere, someone who knows this job and takes it seriously, someone who understands the issues a president faces are not black and white,” Mrs. Obama said on the opening night of the Democratic convention. Referring to Trump’s penchant for tweeting, she said of the presidency: “It cannot be boiled down to 140 characters.”

The first lady was among a high-wattage line-up of speakers taking the stage, all but wiping away earlier tumult that had exposed deep tensions between Clinton supporters and those loyal to her primary opponent Bernie Sanders.

Sanders was closing the night, speaking just after Massachusetts. Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Sanders, comparing Trump’s stances and statements to Clinton’s record, said in remarks released before his speech, “By these measures, any objective observer will conclude that – based on her ideas and her leadership – Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States. The choice is not even close.”

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More than 50 pro-Sanders demonstrators cited by police

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Police briefly detained more than 50 people after they tried to storm the barricades outside the Democratic National Convention on Monday in a show of anger over Bernie Sanders’ treatment by party leaders, even as he urged his supporters to fall in line behind Hillary Clinton.

Several hundred Sanders supporters and other demonstrators converged in the sweltering heat on Broad Street and made their way 4 miles to the convention site as the gathering was being gaveled to order, chanting “Nominate Sanders or lose in November!” and “Hey, hey, ho, ho, the DNC has got to go!” They carried signs reading, “Never Hillary,” ”Just Go to Jail Hillary” and “You Lost Me at Hillary.”

As tensions mounted outside the Wells Fargo Center, police moved metal fences into place and closed the nearest subway station to arriving trains. Fifty-five people were issued citations for disorderly conduct when protesters tried to climb over police barricades at the edge of the security zone surrounding the convention, police said.

The anger reflected the widening rift inside the Democratic Party and the convention hall between Sanders’ supporters and Clinton’s. Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned as Democratic Party chairwoman on Sunday over leaked emails suggesting the supposedly neutral Democratic National Committee played favorites during the primaries by siding with Clinton and bad-mouthing Sanders.

Speaking to delegates Monday morning, Sanders implored them to vote for Clinton, generating a chorus of boos.

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Democratic emails: All about the hack, the leak, the discord

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — First came the hack, then the leak. Now, the Clinton and Trump campaigns are fighting over Russia’s role in the release of thousands of internal Democratic National Committee emails.

At least one thing is clear: The email uproar is an unwelcome distraction at the launch of the Democratic National Convention, inflaming the rift between supporters of Hillary Clinton and primary rival Bernie Sanders just when the party was hoping to close it.

As the Philadelphia convention got underway Monday, developments in the email story rolled out in rapid sequence:

Clinton’s campaign, citing a cybersecurity firm hired to investigate the leak, blamed Russia for hacking the party’s computers and suggested the goal was to benefit Donald Trump’s campaign.

Trump dismissed that idea as laughable, tweeting: “The new joke in town is that Russia leaked the disastrous DNC e-mails.”

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10 Things to Know for Tuesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Tuesday:

1. CLINTON CONVENTION TRIES TO END DEMOCRATIC DISUNITY

Hillary Clinton’s campaign sought to squelch a political firestorm over hacked emails that deepened dissent among Bernie Sanders’ supporters, turning to some of the party’s biggest stars to heal divisions on the Democratic convention’s opening night.

2. THE CONVENTION’S COLD WAR TWIST

The release of hacked Democratic party emails inflames the rift between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders — and gives Donald Trump ammunition. Now, the Clinton and Trump campaigns are fighting over Russia’s role in the release of thousands of internal Democratic National Committee emails.

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At least 19 killed, about 20 injured in knifing near Tokyo

SAGAMIHARA, Japan (AP) — At least 19 people were killed and about 20 wounded in a knife attack Tuesday at a facility for the handicapped in a city just outside Tokyo in the worst mass killing in generations in Japan.

Police said they responded to a call at about 2:30 a.m. from an employee saying something horrible was happening at the facility in the city of Sagamihara, 50 kilometers (30 miles) west of Tokyo.

A man turned himself in at a police station about two hours later, police in Sagamihara said. He left the knife in his car when he entered the station. He has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and trespassing.

Officials in Kanagawa prefecture, which borders Tokyo, identified the suspect as Satoshi Uematsu, and said he had worked at the facility until February. Japanese media reports said he was 26 years old.

He entered the building about 2:10 a.m. by breaking a glass window on the first floor of a residential building at the facility, Shinya Sakuma, head of prefectural health and welfare division, said at a news conference.

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IS attacker: Germans “won’t be able to sleep peacefully”

ANSBACH, Germany (AP) — A Syrian man who tried unsuccessfully to claim asylum in Germany pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group and vowed the nation’s people “won’t be able to sleep peacefully anymore” in a cell phone video before blowing himself up outside a wine bar, wounding 15 people, authorities said Monday.

The assailant set off a backpack laden with explosives and shrapnel Sunday night after being refused entry to a crowded music festival in the Bavarian city of Ansbach because he didn’t have a ticket.

It was the fourth attack to shake Germany in a week, and the second claimed by the Islamic State group. Three of the attacks were carried out by recent immigrants, rekindling concerns about Germany’s ability to cope with the estimated 1 million migrants registered entering the country last year, an influx that has since dwindled as the flow of newcomers slowed.

Bavarian Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann said a laptop with extremist videos was found at the apartment of the suspect, a 27-year-old Syrian identified only as Mohammad D in line with German privacy laws. A video on his cellphone showed him declaring loyalty to the Islamic State group and announcing a “revenge act against Germans because they are standing in the way of Islam.”

The suspect also declared Germans “won’t be able to sleep peacefully anymore,” Herrmann said. “I think after this video there’s no doubt that the attack was a terror attack with an Islamist motivation.”

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Flight 370: With search suspended, a cold-case file awaits

BANGKOK (AP) — For two years and more, it has been a lost ship, a metal container carrying 239 souls that simply disappeared one late Asian night never to be seen again. And now, the search for the remains of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 likely will become a thing of memory, too.

With Friday’s announcement that the meticulous ocean search for the missing jetliner will be suspended — in effect, called off — one of this decade’s most tantalizing unanswered questions is headed toward becoming, in effect, a cold case.

“I am not surprised it’s coming to an end without any answers,” Tony Wong, a businessman in Kuala Lumpur, said Monday.

“People are slowly forgetting the incident,” he said. “No one will ever know the truth.”

The truth may be out there. The problem is, you have to know where to look. And that’s been precisely the problem all along.

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APNewsBreak: Pfizer: Arkansas execution would ‘misuse’ drug

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An execution drug obtained by the Arkansas prison system this month appears to have been made by a subsidiary of Pfizer, even though the pharmaceutical giant has said it doesn’t want its drugs to be used in executions.

The sale of the vecuronium bromide by an unknown third party may show how difficult it could be for manufacturers to prevent such sales in states such as Arkansas that have execution secrecy laws.

The Associated Press on Monday obtained redacted photos of the vecuronium bromide label from the Arkansas Department of Correction. It matches labels submitted to the National Institutes of Health by Hospira, Inc., which Pfizer bought last year. The AP also obtained the purchase orders for the drug, but the name of the third party that sold the drug to the department was redacted, in compliance with the state’s execution secrecy law.

Pfizer announced in May it had put in place sweeping controls to make sure its distributors would not sell its drugs for use in executions. In an email Monday, company spokeswoman Rachel Hooper reiterated that position.

“We have implemented a comprehensive strategy and enhanced restricted distribution protocols for a select group of products to help combat their unauthorized use for capital punishment. Pfizer is currently communicating with states to remind them of our policy,” Hooper wrote. She didn’t address whether the company was aware of the sale of its subsidiary’s drug to the Arkansas Department of Correction.

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Historic solar flight marks first round-the-world journey

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The world’s first round-the-world flight to be powered solely by the sun’s energy made history Tuesday as it landed in Abu Dhabi, where it first took off on an epic 25,000-mile (40,000-kilometer) journey that began more than a year ago.

Since its March 2015 take off, the Swiss-engineered Solar Impulse 2 has made 16 stops across the world without using a drop of fuel to demonstrate that using the plane’s clean technologies on the ground can halve the world’s energy consumption, save natural resources and improve quality of life.

After landing the plane, pilot Bertrand Piccard was greeted outside the cockpit by his Solar Impulse partner and fellow pilot Andre Borschberg. They hugged and pumped their fists in the air.

“The future is clean. The future is you. The future is now. Let’s take it further,” Piccard said, speaking through a microphone to applause and cheers from a crowd that included Prince Albert of Monaco.

The aircraft is uniquely powered by 17,248 solar cells that transfer energy to four electrical motors that power the plane’s propellers. It runs on four lithium polymer batteries at night. The plane’s wingspan stretches 236 feet (72 meters) to catch the sun’s energy.

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Fox News ousts 2 more executives

NEW YORK (AP) — Four days after the ouster of Roger Ailes as Fox News chief, two more executives at the network have been axed.

But the firing of Michael Clemente and his top deputy, Peter Boyer, were not related to the sexual harassment allegations that forced Ailes out at the network that he started two decades ago, two Fox executives said Monday, speaking on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to discuss personnel issues.

Clemente was executive vice president of news at Fox until April, when he was demoted and put in charge of a new division for specials and long form programming. He worked at ABC News before coming to Fox.

Fox says it is reevaluating that division as it concentrates on the election over the next few months.

Ailes resigned Thursday after being sued by a former Fox anchor who alleged she was punished for resisting his sexual advances and complaining about an atmosphere of harassment at Fox. Other women have come forward, and published stories last weekend quoted a woman who said she was victimized by another Fox executive who had since left the network.

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