The Latest: Christie asks GOP faithful for Clinton verdict


CLEVELAND (AP) — The Latest on the Republican National Convention (all times EDT):

9:50 p.m.

Republicans are breaking out into chants of “lock her up” as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tries to impugn Hillary Clinton’s character in his speech to the Republican National Convention.

Christie says as a former federal prosecutor, he wants to hold Clinton accountable for her actions. He says he’s laying out what he says are facts about her to “a jury of her peers.”

Guilty or not guilty — that’s what Christie is asking his audience for a verdict about Clinton on her leadership on the Islamic State group, China, and an al-Qaida-linked group in Nigeria.

Each time, delegates are responding with boisterous chants of “guilty.”

Republican activists repeatedly interrupted Chistie with shouts of — “Lock her up.”

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9:42 p.m.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says Hillary Clinton lied to the nation about “her selfish, awful judgment.” Christie — who fell short in his GOP presidential bid — says voters shouldn’t elect Clinton as president and reward what he calls her incompetence.

Christie is firmly behind Republican nominee Donald Trump — and says he’s been friends with Trump for 14 years.

Christie tells the Republican National Convention that Clinton’s performance as secretary of state was dismal. He says voters should hold her accountable for failures in Libya, Syria and elsewhere.

Christie says Clinton also is responsible for a bad nuclear deal with Iran.

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9:42 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says scandal follows Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton “like flies.”

McConnell is using his speech to the Republican National Convention to rip into the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

The Kentucky senator says he’s spent more time around the Clintons than anyone should ever have to spend.

McConnell says he’s disagreed with President Barack Obama, but that at least Obama was upfront about his intentions “to move America to the left.”

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9:40 p.m.

Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson says Hillary Clinton is promoting a “new world order” that would allow the government in Washington to trample Americans’ freedoms.

The retired neurosurgeon is set to tell delegates at the Republican National Committee that Clinton will push what he’s calling “cancerous policies” that perpetuate poverty.

Carson says Clinton would appoint liberal Supreme Court justices who would cement those policies.

Carson — in excerpts of his prepared remarks — says Donald Trump would preserve the “ideals upon which this country was founded.”

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9:25 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan says he’ll be sharing the rostrum with “President Donald Trump” the next time there’s a State of the Union address on Capitol Hill.

Ryan hesitated for a while before finally endorsing the businessman last month. The Wisconsin lawmaker tells the Republican National Convention that only by electing Trump and running mate Mike Pence does the country “have a chance at a better way.”

He says Hillary Clinton represents a third term of what he’s calling President Barack Obama’s failed presidency.

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9:20 p.m.

Republican congressional leaders are assuring party delegates that having Donald Trump in the White House will help achieve key GOP legislative objectives.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Trump will sign bills to repeal President Barack Obama’s health care law, build the Keystone pipeline and deny Planned Parenthood any federal money.

McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan also are delivering broadsides against Hillary Clinton and her fellow Democrats.

McConnell says Clinton has “a tortured relationship to the truth.”

Ryan says Clinton represents a third term of Obama’s presidency instead of the “clean break from a failed system” that many Americans want.

The Wisconsin Republican says next week’s Democratic convention will be a “four-day infomercial of politically correct moralizing.”

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9:05 p.m.

Donald Trump says he’s proud to be the Republican presidential nominee.

Trump is offering his first words to the party convention after being declared the nominee. He says in a video played in the convention hall that he’s honored to have Mike Pence as his running mate and that the Indiana governor will make a “great, great vice president.”

Trump says he’ll appear with Pence in Cleveland on both Wednesday and Thursday. He says they’ll win Ohio and the presidency.

Trump is promising to bring “real change and leadership” to Washington.

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8:20 p.m.

Mystery solved at the GOP convention.

The question is why all 19 delegates from the District of Columbia were awarded to Donald Trump.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio won the district’s convention during the primary season and Ohio Gov. John Kasich came in second. Trump didn’t win any delegates back in March.

But party rules in the district say that if only one candidate’s name is placed into nomination at the national convention, then all 19 delegates go to that candidate.

Trump was the only candidate to be nominated at the convention.

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8:15 p.m.

Mike Pence has been nominated as the Republican vice presidential candidate — and Donald Trump’s running mate.

The Indiana governor was declared the nominee by acclimation — meaning no formal roll call vote is needed. That ruling came from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he presided over the party’s convention.

McConnell says Pence has the “overwhelming support of this convention” to be the next vice president.

Indiana Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb — who put Pence’s name in nomination — says Pence has overseen record investments in education and eliminated red tape for businesses. He says under Pence’s leadership, more Indiana residents are working and the tech sector is experiencing “explosive” growth.

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8:10 p.m.

House Speaker Paul Ryan has formally declared Donald Trump the winner of the Republican presidential nomination.

Ryan says Trump received 1,725 delegates in the state-by-state roll call. Ryan says Texas Sen. Ted Cruz was the runner-up with 475 delegates. Ohio Gov. John Kasich came in third with 129 votes, followed by 113 for Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Fifth-place went to physician Ben Carson with seven delegates, followed by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush with three delegates and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul with two delegates.

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8:05 p.m.

Donald Trump is celebrating his big achievement Tuesday night: officially becoming the Republican nominee for president.

Trump has posted a tweet that it was “such a great honor” after the roll call of the states at the Republican National Convention gave him the number of delegates needed to become the GOP’s nominee.

He added: “I will work hard and never let you down! AMERICA FIRST!”

Trump is set to formally accept the nomination during a Thursday night speech at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

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8 p.m.

Donald Trump may officially be the Republican nominee, but that didn’t stop at least one state from taking exception to the way its votes were counted during Tuesday night’s presidential roll call at the GOP convention.

The Alaska delegation is disputing how its votes were recorded and requesting a formal poll of its delegates. But House Speaker Paul Ryan has declared that Alaska’s 28 votes are going to Trump — who already had more delegates than he needed to win.

The dispute appeared to be over Alaska state party rules that say a candidate loses his or her delegates if the candidate’s campaign is no longer active.

All of Trump’s challengers suspended their campaigns when it became clear the New Yorker would win the nomination.

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7:55 p.m.

Not every Republican activist is so excited now that Donald Trump has clinched the party’s presidential nomination.

Colorado delegate Kendal Unruh says it’s time to “cancel the convention, stop the sham.” She says Trump has worked to coronate himself king.

Unruh is warning there could be drama and a “show of displeasure” coming on Thursday when Trump is set to speak at the convention.

Colorado cast most of its votes for Cruz.

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7:45 p.m.

Even as they’re casting votes for John Kasich (KAY’-sihk) during the roll call of the states, numerous delegates are the Republican National Convention are still getting the Ohio governor’s last name wrong.

It rhymes with “basic.”

But at least three delegates announcing their state’s votes for the nomination pronounced the second syllable like the word “itch.”

The frequent stumbling over Kasich’s last name was something of a running joke while Kasich was competing for the Republican presidential nomination.

He dropped out in May, but still was awarded delegates at the convention because of votes he won in the primary contests.

Kasich wasn’t present for Tuesday night’s proceedings, despite the fact that the convention is taking place in his home state.

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7:35 p.m.

New Mexico’s governor refused to endorse Donald Trump after he chastised her for not doing her job when it comes to unemployment and other issues.

But there was Susana Martinez on the floor of the Republican National Convention and introducing the young delegate who announced New Mexico’s tally during the roll call of states.

Trump won the nomination Tuesday night, and New York put him over the top.

Some prominent Republicans have stayed away from the convention, but Martinez has been a visible presence in Cleveland.

Trump criticized Martinez in May at a campaign appearance in New Mexico, but later said he wanted her support. Martinez is the nation’s first female Hispanic governor.

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7:25 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is blaming what he calls are “Clinton Democrats” for a Senate standoff that’s blocked President Barack Obama’s request for money to fight the Zika virus.

Congress is now on a seven-week recess, and left Washington without acting on the Zika money. Democrats objected to a GOP proposal that would block Planned Parenthood clinics in Puerto Rico from getting money to fight the virus.

McConnell is blaming the impasses on Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

The Kentucky lawmaker is speaking later Tuesday night at the convention but some of his remarks are being released beforehand.

McConnell says he wonders what Democrats “think public service is about.” He says the presidential election will answer this basic question: “Who is looking out for us?”

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7:15 p.m.

Donald Trump’s son Donald Jr. cast the final votes his father needed to become the Republican presidential nominee.

The younger Trump was on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and told the excited activists in the auditorium that New York was casting 89 votes for Trump and six for Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

He then shouted out: “Congratulations, Dad, we love you.”

Donald Jr. says he’s watched as his father has built a movement and he says that movement has given Americans a voice again.

Also on the convention floor are some of Donald Trump’s other children, including Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump.

Delegates on the floor broke into cheers and waved signs as the song “New York, New York” played at the Quicken Loans Arena.

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7:10 p.m.

Make it official: The Republican Party has nominated Donald Trump for president.

And now the New York billionaire has completed a remarkable rise from political outsider to major party nominee for the White House.

New York put him over the top in the delegate count Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention.

There was a disruptive fight on Monday night over the party’s rules, but a day later that was history.

There was little drama as party delegates united behind the real estate mogul and reality TV star.

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6:58 p.m.

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager — Corey Lewandowski — has announced how his home state of New Hampshire is casting its votes for the Republican nomination.

Lewandowski was fired by the Trump campaign last month. But he’s remained a vocal supporter of Trump and has advocated for him in his new role as a commentator on CNN.

Lewandowski note that New Hampshire was the first primary contest that Trump won. He says New Hampshire is casting 11 of its votes for “my friend and the next president of the United States, Donald J. Trump.”

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6:43 p.m.

Republican convention officials are giving some delegates won by Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Ohio Gov. John Kasich to Donald Trump.

Rubio won the District of Columbia convention and got 10 delegates. Kasich came in second and got nine. That’s how the district’s delegation announced its tally from the floor of the convention.

But the convention’s presiding officer awarded all 19 delegates to Trump.

Here’s what delegate Chip Nottingham thought of that move:

“The chair, in a power play, just deemed that all 19 would go to Trump ’cause they don’t want any dissent even though they clearly have a majority of votes that they need.”

Nottingham demanded that the delegation be polled. But convention officials didn’t give him the chance to speak.

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