AP News in Brief at 6:04 p.m. EDT


Family: Military changed Dallas suspect; robot use defended

DALLAS (AP) — Military service changed the Dallas gunman from an extrovert into a hermit, his parents said in an interview excerpt published Monday.

Micah Johnson’s mother, Delphine Johnson, told TheBlaze website in an interview that her son wanted to be a police officer as a child. His six years in the Army Reserve, including a tour in Afghanistan, were “not what Micah thought it would be … what he thought the military represented, it just didn’t live up to his expectations.” According to the military lawyer who represented him, Johnson was accused of sexually harassing a female soldier while deployed.

His father, James Johnson said haltingly and through tears: “I don’t know what to say to anybody to make anything better. I didn’t see it coming.”

The black 25-year-old fatally shot five officers in Thursday’s attack while hundreds of people were gathered in downtown Dallas to protest recent fatal police shootings, and wounded at least nine officers and two civilians.

Dallas Police Chief David Brown clarified Monday where Johnson was killed with a bomb delivered by a remote-controlled robot, saying that it happened on the second floor of El Centro College, not a parking garage as authorities previously described. Brown did not provide more details, including the locations of the negotiations that came before the bomb.

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Sheriff: 2 bailiffs, suspect dead in Michigan courthouse

ST. JOSEPH, Mich. (AP) — Two bailiffs were shot and killed Monday inside a southwestern Michigan courthouse before officers killed the gunman, a sheriff said.

The incident occurred on the third floor of the Berrien County Courthouse in St. Joseph, 100 miles northeast of Chicago.

Sheriff Paul Bailey didn’t provide additional details on how the shooting happened. He said he did not know anything about the shooter, why he was in the courthouse or how he got a gun. A sheriff’s deputy who was shot was in stable condition at a hospital, and a fifth person was injured, although how that person was hurt wasn’t immediately clear.

“I stand here with a heavy heart. A person has shot two bailiffs. They’re both deceased,” Bailey told reporters.

Other people in the area of the shooting sought shelter before “brave officers were able to come to their rescue and take the shooter down,” the sheriff said. He didn’t elaborate.

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Dallas sniper victims included fathers, volunteers, veterans

They were spouses and parents. They volunteered in schools and at church. And they had sworn to serve and protect.

The five officers killed in Thursday’s sniper attack in Dallas are being remembered for their character and service to others.

The attack also injured at least nine officers and two civilians. Here’s a closer look at the victims:

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A COPS’ COP

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Cameron to quit Wednesday; Theresa May to be new British PM

LONDON (AP) — A political era ended Monday — unexpectedly and without an election — as Prime Minister David Cameron said he will step down in two days in favor of Theresa May, a senior member of his Cabinet who will become Britain’s second female leader.

Cameron announced his resignation last month because he backed the losing side in a referendum for Britain to leave the European Union. So did May — but infighting, bad timing and cold feet among leaders of the victorious “leave” campaign means that she will have the task of leading a divided country out of the EU.

The latest chapter in the political turmoil spawned by the EU vote moved with breathtaking speed.

On Monday morning, there were two candidates to lead the governing Conservative Party. At noon, Andrea Leadsom stepped down, making May leader-in-waiting. By late afternoon, Cameron had announced that May would be moving into 10 Downing Street within 48 hours.

“We will have a new prime minister in that building behind me by Wednesday evening,” Cameron said in a brief statement outside the leader’s official London residence.

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Stealth candidate Theresa May to be UK’s next leader

LONDON (AP) — After all of the flamboyant characters and very public backstabbing in the race to become Britain’s next prime minister, the winner turned out to be an understated workhorse who maintained a low profile throughout the campaign.

Home Secretary Theresa May, 59, is not well-known internationally, but she has served for six years in one of Britain’s toughest jobs, playing an important role in counter-terrorism policy, and will now take charge of delicate negotiations to separate Britain from the European Union.

She was less visible — and less talked-about as a likely future prime minister — than Treasury Chief George Osborne and former London Mayor Boris Johnson, but she proved to be the stealth candidate, outmaneuvering both in the intense competition to follow Cameron at 10 Downing Street.

During the EU referendum campaign, Osborne was passionate about remaining in the EU, and lost his leadership hopes when voters turned the other way. Johnson led the campaign to take Britain out of the EU, but never formally entered the leadership race because of dwindling support among his party’s lawmakers.

By contrast, May stayed largely out of the referendum fray. She tepidly backed remaining in the EU in a single speech, then remained largely out of sight as the behemoths of the Conservative Party — including Cameron and Justice Secretary Michael Gove — did each other in.

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A lot of holes in GOP presidential ground game in key states

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Presidential battleground states were supposed to be swarming with Republican Party workers by now.

“We’ve moved on to thousands and thousands of employees,” party chairman Reince Priebus declared in March, contrasting that with the GOP’s late-blooming staffing four years earlier. “We are covering districts across this country in ways that we’ve never had before.”

That hasn’t exactly happened, a state-by-state review conducted by The Associated Press has found.

With early voting beginning in less than three months in some states, the review reveals that the national GOP has delivered only a fraction of the ground forces detailed in discussions with state leaders earlier in the year. And that is leaving anxious local officials waiting for reinforcements to keep pace with Democrat Hillary Clinton in the states that matter most in 2016.

To be sure, the national party actually has notched record levels of fundraising over the past few years and put together a much more robust ground game than it had in 2012. But officials acknowledge the real competition isn’t their past results or the chronically cash strapped Democratic Party. It’s Clinton and what GOP party chairman Priebus calls “that machine” of Clinton fundraising.

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To Democrats, must-see TV is Trump mocking disabled reporter

WASHINGTON (AP) — Here’s Grace, a sweetly smiling little girl in a wheelchair. Now here’s her mother, Lauren Glaros: “When I saw Donald Trump mock a disabled person, I was just shocked,” she says. Then we see Trump, his hands jerking in front of his body as he imitates a reporter who has a condition that limits his arm movement.

To the Democrats, it’s a picture worthy of a thousand commercials.

That’s why two versions of the advertisement called “Grace” have been on television more than almost any other at this early stage of the general election campaign. They’ve appeared some 7,200 times in 10 states across the country, with the heaviest concentration in the always-hard-fought presidential battlegrounds of Florida and Ohio, an analysis from Kantar Media’s campaign advertising tracker shows.

The commercials are paid for by Priorities USA, a super political action committee dedicated to helping elect Hillary Clinton. Only a Clinton campaign advertisement about the former first lady’s work to expand children’s health care has aired more since mid-May, when general election ads began hitting the air.

Even among Trump’s many controversial statements — Clinton aides see them as an embarrassment of riches — the footage of him appearing to mock a disabled reporter stands out, evoking one of the strongest reactions from voters in focus groups and other forums.

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Advocates fear more heroin withdrawal deaths in jails

LEBANON, Pa. (AP) — In the days following her 18-year-old daughter’s first arrest on heroin charges, Stephanie Moyer took solace in thinking she would be safe in jail until she got into a treatment program.

However, Victoria “Tori” Herr sounded disoriented on a call home three days later. She feared she was dying and begged for something to drink, her mother said.

Herr, who had a 10-bag-a-day habit, collapsed following days of severe vomiting and diarrhea at the Lebanon County Correctional Facility. She spent five days in the hospital, then died on Easter Sunday 2015.

Her case is one of at least a half-dozen deaths nationwide during the last two years involving jail heroin withdrawal, and advocates fear the number will grow given the nation’s heroin crisis. Advocates find the deaths particularly troubling because opioid withdrawal, while miserable, is rarely life-threatening if medication, monitoring and intravenous fluids are available.

“This is a woman who died because she was detoxing,” said Moyer’s lawyer, Jonathan Feinberg, who filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Monday. “Had Tori Herr’s withdrawal been treated … she almost certainly would be alive today.”

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Q&A: Superbug precursor found in US again

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City patient was infected with bacteria that had a special type of resistance to antibiotics last year, the earliest known case in the U.S. of bacteria that could lead to a superbug impervious to medications.

The bacteria were found in a patient who was treated in May of 2015 and reported in a study published Monday. They were discovered by an Iowa company that’s been testing thousands of bacteria collected from patients from around the world over the last two years.

The company, JMI Laboratories, found hundreds globally that were resistant to colistin, an old, powerful antibiotic that is now seen as a drug of last resort. Health officials worry that these bacteria will spread their resistance to last-resort antibiotics to other bacteria that are already resistant to front-line antibiotics, creating germs that can’t be killed by any known drugs.

A similar infection was reported in a Pennsylvania woman earlier this year and initially reported as the first known U.S. case. But the New York case happened almost a year before, and scientists now believe these bacteria were likely in people in the U.S. even earlier.

WHY ARE PEOPLE WORRIED?

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5-time NBA champion Tim Duncan retires after 19 seasons

Tim Duncan spent nearly two decades as the quiet storm in the middle of the San Antonio Spurs franchise, putting the team on his broad shoulders and carrying it to heights unseen in modern American sports.

With Duncan as the focal point, the Spurs won five championships, made the playoffs in all 19 of his seasons and cemented themselves as one of the most successful sports franchises in history. And now, the tireless and reluctant superstar is finally calling it a career.

The 40-year-old Duncan announced his retirement on Monday, marking the end of an era for the Spurs and the NBA.

“The greatest power forward ever,” the Los Angeles Clippers’ Jamal Crawford said Monday, as the tributes to Duncan’s career began coming.

Few would dare argue.

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